We Never Had a Friend Like You

This morning, we pay tribute to a man who left us way too soon. Entertainer and Disney Legend Robin Williams left his mark on this world in so many ways, and left us way too early. Perhaps because of how it happened… perhaps because the stigma of depression that so many struggle with was given a very public face… perhaps because we just weren’t ready to say goodbye… This one affected so many in so many different ways. Today, Craig, Jake and Hayden share their individual tributes to the talented genius that was Robin Williams.

 

Robin Williams (1951-2014) and his Disney animation alter-ego, The Genie

Robin Williams (1951-2014) and his Disney animation alter-ego, The Genie

 

From Jake:

When kids like myself grow up, we look up to people who can make us laugh. Why? We look up to people who can make us laugh because it’s the purest form of happiness. Laughter is universal, and with laughter is its predecessor: comedy. The world lost one of the best comedians who made the world laugh for years and years. Robin Williams was a man who I admired growing up. His humor was for everyone. He had family jokes, kid jokes, adult jokes. Just a little something for everyone. Yet today, Mr. Williams passed away. A man who was admired for decades worth of roles that spanned a variety of film styles. He went from being a doctor with a red nose, to a wise cracking professor helping Will Hunting fully utilize his brilliance. He was a stand up comedian who didn’t just get us to laugh, but think about why we were laughing, and what we were laughing at. It was true brilliance. Some may disagree, but I would put him on a pedestal next to other greats. If Charlie Chaplin were alive, I would bet he could give him a run for his money.  If George Carlin had a stand-up competition, Robin would go toe-to-toe. He was a mastermind of what to say, when and how to deliver it, and we would all erupt with laughter. Now, we’re going to laugh less because we lost him. There’s no more new characters, only the ones we grew up with. Thankfully, we can revisit Genie, Pan, Patch Adams, and Mrs. Doubtfire, and many more, and remember a man who once said as Dr. Sean Maguire in ‘Good Will Hunting’: “Real loss is only possible when you love something more than you love yourself.”

 

From Hayden:

The news of Robin Williams’ passing has been a tough reality to process. The Birdcage has one less bird, Peter Banning has flown back to Neverland.

Unbeknownst to many of you, I spent the weekend in Disneyland. On an evening walk down Main Street, it was touching to see a hardly-noticeable homage paid to Mr. Williams by the Silhouette Studio; A small, Genie portrait was placed in their window display. I spoke with the artist responsible, briefly thanking him for such a sweet gesture. We both agreed: the world lost a lot of good heart today, and has a little less to laugh about.

Toodles, Mrs. Doubtfire. Good night, Mr. Colema… Er, Goldman. Enjoy your freedom, Genie.

 

From Craig

Words were hard to come by upon learning of his passing, but emotions weren’t. In a mere matter of moments, I felt myself going from shock to extreme sadness, from sadness to anger, from anger to empathy, to a feeling of true loss in this world. Even now I find myself asking why. Sure, I can feel angry that Mr. Williams chose to leave this world and rob his fans, and more importantly friends and family of any time he may have had left on this earth. But then, a form of depression so strong can take its toll in ways I personally have no understanding of, so that’s not completely fair. Nonetheless, I feel an emptiness at the passing of one of the true greats in the business. As a child I grew up with Mork from Ork. With the addition of a cable box in my household, I watched Robert Altman’s Popeye more times than I care to remember. Say what you want about the very… unique movie, Williams’ performance as Popeye was very memorable. As I got older, movies like Dead Poets’ Society, Good Morning Vietnam,  and Awakenings showed an entirely new side of Robin’s talent. Then came Aladdin. The role of the Genie may be the most remembered role by any Disney fan. Giving Robin free reign to improvise was a sheer genius move – even from the animation side. Sitting in the movie theater, watching this incredibly spastic and hilarious performance… I was in tears of laughter. It was Robin Williams unleashed in a family friendly format, yet still with decidedly adult comedy. I loved it, as did countless others.

However, for me, the most memorable performance of his career was yet to come. In 1997, Miramax Films (a division of Disney pictures at the time) released Good Will Hunting, a movie about a troubled South Boston youth who is eventually helped and mentored by a therapist, played by Robin Williams. Williams won an Academy Award for best supporting actor, and it’s not hard to see why. To me, this movie showed the most genius levels of his acting. Williams’ Sean Maguire is funny, inspiring, and in turn, heartbreaking. The following scene epitomizes what I’ll miss most about the amazing work of Robin Williams. In one scene, he manages to go from heartbreaking to funny, only to turn sentimental and inspirational at the end. It was by far, one of the most human roles I’ve ever seen him do. (Warning: Some pretty foul language here. Don’t watch in front of kids or if you’re offended by strong language.)

 

 

 

Robin, I hope you’re at peace now. I want to thank you for the years you spent with us. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: You left too soon. But you left us with a lot. And for that, you’ll always be remembered fondly.

Why I Write (And Why I Sometimes Don’t)

Greetings all – long time no talk!

Today, I thought I’d tackle perhaps the nearest and dearest subject that I can when it comes to this site and yours truly: Why I write, and why sometimes it seems there are huge gaps when I don’t.

 

 

So why do I write?

Well, the answer to that is quite simple, honestly. I love to write. It’s something I love to do. When I sit down at a keyboard, or with pen and paper in hand (which, I’ll be honest, doesn’t happen frequently), the words start flowing. It frees the soul – it’s a true passion of mine. If I could get paid to write for a living I would in a heartbeat. In fact, I have a few things I’m working on (non-Disney related) to work toward that goal someday. But I digress….

Why do I write about Disney?

First and foremost, it’s because I love Disney. With such a vast richness that the company and its history have to offer, along with my experiences with them, I feel there is so much to be said. Not that Disney is the only thing in life I feel is worth writing about – nor the only thing I love. Nonetheless, it is a powerful subject that touches so many.

Which brings me to the second reason….

Because Disney reaches so many, we have common bonds. We have fond memories of the past and often savor the hope and challenge of the future. We also have areas of disagreement as well. Many out there like to point out flaws they see within the company: in the parks, films, leadership. Now, I’m not saying that criticisms are bad. In fact, they’re quite necessary – if we didn’t have a voice, there would be no individuality, no changes. However, many sites and blogs, when they start with criticisms…. Well, let’s just say the entire area seems to take on a very cynical tone. It soon becomes a place looked at as a “Disney bashing” site, which, may or may not be entirely fair based on the situation.

Nonetheless, seeing so much in the way of criticism sent me on a course of thinking: what if I started writing about the positives? The reasons I love Disney? The magical moments, the theme parks, music, movies… there’s just so much to speak happy thoughts of! Thus, Confessions of a DisNerd was born. In doing so, I have strived to keep a positive and upbeat vibe in everything I post.

It’s not always easy. There are times I don’t agree with decisions the Walt Disney Company has made. I think this is to be expected in every corporation, as well as in any walk of life including familial relations and friendships. If we all agreed 100% of the time, things would just be…well, weird. When it comes to such things, however, I choose to not post or talk about it here. There are plenty of sites and blogs willing to discuss those matters, so why not leave it to them? I prefer to discuss the good instead.

I will admit, when it comes to negative posts on other blogs and sites, things can get downright vitriolic. Even from those who look to defend Disney, many times arguments get reduced to name calling and incredulous statements. Nowhere is this more evident than in social media, where thoughts and arguments get reduced to memes and 140 characters. I’ve allowed myself to get caught up in this whirlwind at times, not by throwing myself into the thick of the fight, but by reading and stewing. There’s a real danger in battling negativity to become negative yourself, and this is not okay. In these times, however, I will ultimately say, I have handled it the wrong way.

I stop writing.

I get so fed up with the arguments over leadership, films, theme parks, etc. that I forget to focus on the things I love instead of the arguments that I see come across my Twitter feed. When this happens, I’m not in much of a writing mood, sad to say. But perhaps I should be. Perhaps I should remember the happy things: the music I grew up on, the tv shows and movies I still love, seeing the world of Disney through my daughter’s eyes instead of those of a grumpy old me.

Why do I tell you all of this? Simply, there are times, especially in the recent past, where I have been lax in posting here, or on the social media outlets I have. While yes, things have been busy outside of the blog (life – what’s up with that?), there’s no reason to not remember the positives. That’s what Confessions is all about, after all!

I would love to say,  “Starting today, expect more posts – even a few a week!” But I don’t want to promise what I can’t deliver. I do, however want you, my dear readers who have come with me on this journey thus far to know this: I will try to remember the happiness that Disney brings me, especially in times I am brought down elsewhere. In fansites, in social media, in life outside of the World of Walt, I think this is something we can all do. Focus on what makes us happy.

For me, that’s writing. And I look forward to doing more of it.

So Long, Eddie Valiant… (R.I.P. Bob Hoskins 1942-2014)

bob-hoskins-roger-rabbit

“Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” was one of the iconic films of my childhood. It was one of those unexpected movies for me, one that I found myself laughing quite a bit at. While the Disney and other animation references flew fast and furious, the thing that stood out to me even more was the performance of Bob Hoskins. Mr. Hoskins played the straight man, detective Eddie Valiant quite convincingly, yet it took an amazing level of genius to play it so straight with a bunch of ‘toons. Eddie Valiant was quite the Disney (Yes, I know the movie was made under the Touchstone label) anti-hero: Alcoholic, womanizing, and gruff… Yet, when one learned the painful backstory – a ‘toon killed his brother – one began to sympathize and cheer for him to get justice for Roger and the other Toontown citizens! As I grew older and began to appreciate the film making process even more, I grew to appreciate the talent and physical humor it took to play such a character. The following scene still brings the biggest smile to my face as an adult:

Bob Hoskins passed away on April 29th at the age of 71. Along with the role of Eddie Valiant, Hoskins will be remembered for his roles in Hook, Mermaids, Mona Lisa, and many other films. Today we celebrate all of his great performances and say thank you to an outstanding actor. Rest in peace, Mr. Hoskins. And thank you. You will be missed.

Disneynature’s “Bears” – a Review

Note: I realize this review may be a little late, as “Bears” was released into theaters on April 18th. However, with no opportunity to preview before the release day, I still feel the need to share with anyone still deciding whether to see this movie or not.

DisneyNature's "Bears"

DisneyNature’s “Bears”

 

“Disney” and “Nature.” Two things I absolutely love in this world. The beauty of outdoors, and the fun and memories of the premiere entertainment company for many.  Combine the two, and this should be a match made in heaven for this DisNerd, right? Up until now, I’d have to say, sadly, wrong.

Don’t misunderstand me, I think highly of Disney for attempting these beautifully shot wildlife documentaries released annually around Earth Day. The fact that every year they donate proceeds from opening week to conservation funds? Even better. But, unfortunately, I’m a bit of a wimp. I find it difficult to see animals encountering hardship and perhaps even dying when faced with the elements. Yes, Mufasa explained the great circle of life quite well to me, but that doesn’t mean I can stomach seeing it happen. As amazing as Chimpanzee looked to me, the harshness of a chimp being orphaned made the subject matter hard for me to want to watch, even more so with a little one next to me. I know many have loved the movies, and I’m grateful for that – to see Walt Disney’s “True Life Adventure” legacy carried on in some form is something I’m genuinely happy to see. To raise awareness of animals in their natural habitat is wonderful and definitely to be admired; it’s just not something I can always emotionally handle. Apparently, this has been passed down to my child as well – which, given the fact that she’s six, is quite understandable.

So it was with a little trepidation, Mrs. DisNerd and I decided to take the Little DisNerd to see the latest offering, “Bears,” this past weekend. We did our research beforehand, reading plenty of reviews as to the family-friendliness of the new DisneyNature film.

 

Definitely ready to enter the world of Bears!

Definitely ready to enter the world of Bears!

 

I’m pleased to report that not only did we emerge from the film psychologically unscathed, but we also left with smiles on our faces and a love for all things bear.

Set against the backdrop of a gorgeous Alaskan wilderness, “Bears” follows the first year journey of Sky, a mama grizzly, and her two cubs: “mama’s bear” Amber and the mischievous Scout. Emerging from hibernation, they begin their harrowing journey from their mountainous den to the waters far below in search of food – namely salmon – in order to nourish themselves and fatten up for the next years hibernation. Along the way, they face danger in the form of avalanches, wolves, rising tides, and yes, other bears – mainly in the form of two male grizzlies, Mangus (the alpha male) and Chinook (the exiled, haggard, desperate bear). Of course, the biggest danger lies in not finding enough food to fatten up for the coming hibernation season. If Sky can’t get enough food, she may not be nourished enough to provide for Scout and Amber through the next winter. Looking out for two youngsters make a regular journey much more harrowing, as usual spots can become unsafe due to overbearing males or other predators.

This journey is perfectly narrated by actor John C. Reilly, who combines informational narrative with storytelling and humor, namely in his voiceovers that delve into the insights of the curious and adventurous Scout.

We found “Bears” to be adventurous, humorous, educational, and overall, heartwarming. The story of changing priorities and ambitions is one parents can relate to: when you have little ones, it changes the way you do everything when parental instinct kicks in. And kids? Kids will love the adventures of the cubs, as well as learn something. Our little one, who loves playing in character after seeing movies came home wanting to be “Bear friends.” This consisted of calling each other by the names of Sky, Amber and Scout, and consuming lots and lots of imaginary salmon dishes. I would definitely recommend this documentary for the whole family.

On one last note – we saw this opening weekend, and I was saddened to see we were three of nine in a rather huge movie theater. What kept families away? Was it the documentary nature of the film? The possibility that true life may be too graphic for some? The lack of animated characters that kids so love to see on the big screen? Whatever the reason may be, I truly hope more moviegoers give Bears a chance – it’s truly a movie for the whole family. Plus, if you can see it in its opening week (which is through April 24th, 2014), the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund will make a contribution to the National Park Foundation in honor of those who were able to see the movie.

This Earth Day, I encourage everyone to see Disneynature’s “Bears,” tell others about it, and support great movies and features like this in the theaters. Have you seen “Bears?” Do you plan to? Feel free to comment below, or share this review with others, and let’s fill the theaters for this one!

P.S. – Be sure to stay through the credits to see footage of the film crew at work, getting these breathtaking shots at some rather “too close for comfort” distances!

After All…Or, Happy 50th, Small World!

“There’s so much that we share that it’s time we’re aware… It’s a small world after all.”  – Richard and Robert Sherman

 

small world

“it’s a small world” at Disneyland

It’s the ride and song people love to mock and say they hate. It’s the valley of the dolls in the Happiest Place on Earth. It’s the attraction people most fear getting stuck on. So much so, in fact, that many refuse to ride it. It’s the song that has at times been used as a punchline in Disney movies itself.

It’s also the first attraction we took our daughter on when she visited Disneyland for the first time. It’s the ride that I find myself wanting to do at least once every day of my trip. It’s a song that has shaped not just my philosophy on why I love to write about Disney, but thoughts on life itself.

Yes, we have our differences. But we all have hopes and fears, excitements and disappointments. And I believe in lifting each other up, encouraging, and helping others to smile within the darkness we feel at times. We’re human, and need to treat each other accordingly. I feel that in reaching out to our fellow human beings, we’re helping ourselves as much as each other. Be positive. Learn to look past our differences to love each other. We may not agree on things, but perhaps…there’s some common ground. The mountains may divide us; the oceans may separate us. But in this day and age especially, the world is getting smaller and smaller in terms of communicating and reaching our fellow human beings.  When I think of the song in those terms, when I ride a boat through various countries and see smiling, happy children… I believe the world CAN be better.

There’s a video that I love watching to this day of songwriter Richard Sherman, beginning the song as originally intended – as a ballad. It really drives home the lyrics for me, and many times brings a tear to my eye:

This, to me, is the perfect example of the mastery of the Sherman Brothers’ music in score and lyric. As the story goes, the original concept was for the children of each country to sing their own national anthem. However, on a boat ride, the overlapping songs made for a jumbled, Tower of Babel-esque mess. How beautiful and symbolic for these two to come up with a melody and infusion of lyrics that would carry from room to room regardless of the language in which it was delivered!

A couple years back, upon the passing of Robert Sherman, his son (and co-director of “The Boys: The Sherman Brothers Story”) wrote the following in memoriam of his father:

“From the time the ride opened, it was a tradition for the Bob Sherman family to always go on “It’s a Small World,” every time we visited Disneyland. Dad would be on the boat, but he never took in the ride. He’d watch the children’s faces. Dad studied their awe and wonder and loved that, by the end of the ride, these kids would know the words and be singing along. He’d always tear up.

Dad told me he wished he could just stand at the end of that ride and shake everyone’s hand as they stepped off the boat. He wanted to thank each person for listening, for taking to heart his deceptively simple message of peace and brotherhood….

….It warms my heart to know Dad’s messages of peace and love, brotherhood, charity and humility, hope — and family — are there forever in his and my Uncle’s songs. And I know that somewhere in the world right this very moment, some child is learning and singing out Dad’s lovely words and Dick’s gorgeous melodies — “It’s a Small World” or one of the Sherman Brothers’ thousand other beloved songs. Simple, sing-able and sincere. And these children will, in turn, pass them onto their own. And my Dad is right there with them, smiling through a tear. As I am now.

Dad and his dear, sweet heart and brilliant mind will live on forever. His ride may be over, but when you sing his words, know that Bob Sherman is smiling down on you — and wishing he could shake your hand. —– Thank you.”

Thanks for your words, Jeff. I have no doubt that he is and lives on, not only in this attraction, but in so many other works as well.

I would be remiss in not mentioning others who helped make “it’s a small world” what it is. Wonderful legends such as Mary Blair, Alice Davis, Harriet Burns, Rolly Crump. Their contributions to costuming, architecture and color design helped turn a boat ride in a show building into a beautiful work of art. And of course, the man who dreamed it up and really believed in the message he put forward, Walt Disney himself. Years from now, people will still be making fun of the song. They may still be debating whether Disney characters should have been added to the attraction, whether the outside facade should be colorful or white. Yet, I truly believe that even more people, young and old alike, will continue to ride and be amazed at the artistry and the message the attraction brings. Perhaps they will be able to forget their worries for 15 minutes as they listen to the lyrics, thinking about how wonderful life could be if we all found common ground. Maybe, for at least a moment, they really will realize that it truly IS a small world after all.

Happy birthday, “it’s a small world!” Thanks to all who made it the amazing attraction and song that it has become on a worldwide scale. Here’s to many more happy cruises!

Looking forward to setting sail again!

Looking forward to setting sail again!

 

 

A Bench in the Park

THE Bench. Or at least one of them. There were a few around the carousel at Griffith Park. Photo courtesy Mr. Twitchy

According to Walt, it’s important that we all remember one thing: that it was all started by a mouse. But when it comes to Disneyland, I also can’t help but think…. it was all started by a bench.

As has been repeated over the years, I’m sure by now we all know the story. Walt would occasionally take his daughters on a date to Griffith Park for a day together. As the girls would ride the carousel at the park, Walt would sit and watch, eating popcorn and thinking. Thinking about a park where parents could enjoy themselves as much as their children. Where entire families could have fun instead of someone being relegated to a bench. This bench proved to be a catalyst for Disneyland – a theme park that far exceeded those expectations.

Therefore, it was somewhat both fitting and ironic, when asked by a friend where my favorite spot in Disneyland to just “hang” was, that I responded with “a bench.” But not just any bench. While there are many places to take it easy and rest in the park, there’s one location in my opinion that has the others beat.

Simple, unassuming… and the perfect spot. Photo Courtesy of Mr. Twitchy

While not as exciting as an attraction, nor as appetite satisfying as a restaurant, there’s something incredibly amazing to me about sitting on a bench at the base of Main Street Station, looking out at Main Street toward Sleeping Beauty’s Castle. As one sits on one of these benches, especially later at night, one gets a true feeling of how amazing the park can really be.

Imagine sitting on a bench, listening to turn-of-the-century style music, hearing conversations between cast members and guests, seeing guests hurry into stores to make last minute purchases. Observing other guests as they leave the park for the day with children passed out in strollers. These same little ones who started the day with such energy and excitement are now reliving the adventure in their dreams. While sitting it that spot, you get a whiff of the popcorn from the nearby stand in Town Square, beginning to contemplate giving in and getting your own box. Keep a sharp eye out and you may see a feral cat scurry by amidst all the hustle and bustle, causing you wonder how it feels to be a small feline living in a land of over-sized mice.

If you look further down Main Street, you can see, against a backdrop of a European castle, the outline of a man and a mouse smiling at all the happy guests. At that moment, you turn to look to the fire station and see a light on – indicating that the same man’s spirit lives on…

Yes, that bench is the ultimate “just hang” spot for me. And perhaps that’s the ultimate beauty of Walt’s original Magic Kingdom. With so much to enjoy for the whole family, the benches placed throughout the park give us a view to such an amazing panorama of everything that makes it truly magical.

With that being said, now I ask, dear readers and fellow DisNerds – Do you have a favorite spot to just relax and enjoy within Disneyland or any of Disney’s theme parks for that matter? I’d love to hear from you as well!

On a side note – this weekend (Feb 21st-23rd), Confessions will once again be at Disneyland, including participating in Dapper Day festivites! Make sure you’re following on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook for updates and pictures from the park!

Real Character (Or, How Peter and Jake Made Wendy’s Day Perfectly Darling)

As Confessions moves into 2014 with new ideas and stories, I’m also taking a moment or two to reflect and share a few memorable experiences my family and I had during 2013. This particular instance comes from a trip to Disneyland in September, and serves as an open letter to those who made a possibly sad experience absolutely wonderful.

Dear Residents of Never Land (aka, Peter Pan and Jake the Never Land Pirate),

I write this letter as a long overdue note of thanks for making a five year old’s day at Disneyland so incredibly magical by small acts of kindness that were, in essence, incredibly huge in her eyes – and ours, too!

You see, as I’ve mentioned in the past, Peter Pan and Never Land are huge in our household. While there are other aspects of Disney from day to day, depending on which characters we are “playing” at a particular time, Peter is the constant. Any time we’ve met you at the park, Peter, you’ve always been a highlight and we’ve been excited to see you. So, it was with great anticipation on this trip that our daughter wore the Wendy dress her grandmother had recently made her in anticipation of meeting you.

That day in the park, September 9th, 2013, we arrived and looked for you in the locations and attractions we had met you previously. The early morning yielded no results, although one cast member had mentioned seeing you around Dumbo. Yet, in asking a character handler at the Tangled meet & greet, we were informed that no, you had not made it to the park today. Later, however, we were informed by a cast member at another area of the park, “Peter should definitely be around today!” Being that there was quite a bit of confusion among cast members as to your whereabouts, I ventured to Main Street to chat with the character handlers there to see if I could get a definitive answer. Although I cannot remember the handler’s name, I can tell you what a wonderful help she was. After explaining our situation to her, she stepped back and made a call to the back. Upon her return, she sadly explained that you had some troubles in Never Land that morning. Hook and his fellow pirates were being extra feisty, and you were needed there to reign them in. Sadly, you would not be at the park that day until Soundsational parade time.

While we understood – I mean, these things happen, pirates being how pirates can be – we were nonetheless a little sad. Here our little Wendy had one wish, and that was to meet you and show you her dress, Peter. But being the trooper she was, she held back tears as we went to plan “B.” While she was reluctant to meet Tinker Bell (I guess Wendy and Tink have a bit of a past…), she was more willing to venture across to Disney California Adventure in hopes of meeting Jake (the nice Never Land Pirate) and return to Disneyland later to at least wave to you as you passed by during Soundsational.

Jake, this is where you came in. When we got over to Californina Adventure, you were not out, but were told you would be arriving shortly. The short wait was worth our while, as you instantly recognized Wendy and took her on a magical journey through the streets of Hollywoodland in search of the ever elusive second star to the right. For a full five minutes, the two of you were in your own world, walking down one side of the street and up the other, eyes peeled for any sign of Never Land.

He must be here somewhere!

After finding evidence of a possible path to Never Land (a star in the window of the Animation Building), it was time for you to move on and meet other guests waiting for you. But Jake, you put a smile on that little girl’s face – the biggest one we had seen that day.

At least, the biggest one we had seen so far.

Later that afternoon, we traversed back to Disneyland in order to catch the only showing of Soundsational that day – at park closing. Still unsure of meeting Tink in Pixie Hollow that day (I mean, she HAD wanted to shoot Wendy down, you know…), we made our way to the back of the park for a ride on It’s a Small World. After that, we sat down for a spot at the end of the parade route. As the sun began to set and the parade started, our little Never Lander waited with anticipation to wave to you, Peter.

Waiting For Pan…

Soundsational is definitely a great parade. The music, the upbeat tempo, the cast of characters… this time was no different. Very much worth waiting for. However…the main event was coming up – would you see Wendy and wave back?

Hi, Peter!!!!

Did you see her? Did you ever! Not only did you wave, but you made her feel like the most important person in the world for 15 seconds. When you spotted her, you ran over, got down on her level, and….

“Wendy!!! Where’ve you been? I’ve been looking ALL OVER for you!!! I’m so glad you made it today! I have to get back and catch Hook, but I’m so happy to see you!”

As you ran off to fight those pirates once again, and our little one squealed with glee, you took a moment to point back and tell Tinker Bell she was there. And yes, even Tink was happy to see her!

As adults, many seem to forget the magic of meeting a favorite character in the park. We tend to be the ones gasping at long lines to meet a mouse, a princess, or a boy who never grew up. We scoff at meet & greets and want to get to the rides. But for many of us, we can look at the face of a little girl who just met her hero…

“He stopped the parade just for me!!!” – her exact words!

…and it’s the most important thing about being in a magical place.

So thank you, Peter and Jake. You made a little girl’s day by going above and beyond what many expect. And I am forever grateful for moments and characters like you.

Sincerely,

A Dad Who Never Wants to Grow Up

My dear readers, I wrote this letter with the hopes that it would bring you happiness – to remember what it’s like to see Disney through the eyes of a child. I also did so in the hope that you would help me out with a small favor. See, I would love to see if this could make its way to the “friends” of Peter and Jake that were at the parks that day in September. I really would like them to know of the impact and impression they left on us that day. It truly was magical. Please feel free to share, comment and pass this on to anyone who may be able to get it to these wonderful people. Until next time, my friends, be blessed!

Thankful for Walt

Note: During the months of November and December, I will be posting something I am thankful for within the spectrum of Disney. With so much negativity in the world, I encourage everyone to be thankful and count their blessings.

One of my favorite promotional photos of Walt Disney.

Though there are so many facets of the man’s life worth celebrating, today, we celebrate the man himself. Happy birthday, Walt.

He was a man of humble beginnings. A boy with a paper route. A kid who sold candy on trains. A teenage ambulance driver for the Red Cross. A young man full of ideals and dreams who knew how to work to make it happen. A man who sacrificed much of what he had in order to fulfill said dreams. A man who left this world a better place because he was in it.

Walt wasn’t perfect – to place him on a shrine as such would be foolish and naive. Not every idea he had worked, many risks he took put him in the red, and according to many of his animators and employees, he had a temper that turned him into a “wounded bear.” Nonetheless, he had a drive and an instinct so rare in the world. More often than not, his instinct proved right. Holding back a couple Mickey Mouse cartoons in order to introduce him to the world in sound? Mickey became an overnight sensation. Making a feature length animated movie based on a fairy tale? “Disney’s Folly” was anything but. A theme park in an orange grove in the middle of nowhere? Yes, that one seemed to turn out just fine.

But as stated above, these things didn’t fall in his lap. He had to fight the naysayers tooth and nail: bankers, animators, business analysts, his own brother… But he always saw it through with hard work, big ideas, clever fixes and involvement. There’s an oft attributed to Walt quote that makes its way through different venues – “If You Can Dream It, You Can Do It.” Though this quote was not actually from Walt Disney, (it actually came from Disney Imagineer Tom Fitzgerald), one can see why it could be from him. Only, had Walt said it, it would probably sound something closer to, “If you dream it, follow through. Work hard to make it happen. Follow those dreams into a reality. You CAN do it.”

To me, the man I remember and admire today is the man who had dreams and followed through. He knew people would come to his movies and his parks if he put in the care needed to make it happen. I think today that is sorely missed. Truth be told, as much as we look for “the next Walt,” there will never be another. However, if we use him as an example, perhaps we can keep the spirit and ideals alive.

Thank you for all you did and started, Walt. Thank you for being that example. Happy Birthday, sir.

Thankful For Diane

Note: During the months of November and December, I will be posting something I am thankful for within the spectrum of Disney. With so much negativity in the world, I encourage everyone to be thankful and count their blessings.

Note #2: I realize Hayden covered this subject quite wonderfully in his article, “So Long, Diane.” I am thankful for his words – I just needed to take the time to write this one out, as I am truly thankful for her legacy, and felt the need to share what she meant to me personally.

Diane Disney Miller, standing in front of one of her greatest contributions to the DIsney legacy: The Walt Disney Family Museum.

Diane Disney Miller, standing in front of one of her greatest contributions to the DIsney legacy: The Walt Disney Family Museum.

Some people touch your life in ways you never truly realize until they’re gone.

Perhaps there was this naivete in the mind of this DisNerd (and many other fans) that you’d be around forever, Diane Disney-Miller. That your voice would be heard by legions of fans worldwide of your father’s legacy. That you would continue to work to preserve the memory of what he built with not just your memories and words, but also driving forward projects such as the Walt Disney Concert Hall and the Walt Disney Family Museum. That you would fight and speak out against the Disney company when something wasn’t right. That you would be the voice of the family for many years to come.

Perhaps it was this fantastic assumption of time standing still that made this news quite a bitter pill to take. However, beyond this, there was the fact of where I heard the news. Much like the day I heard of Robert Sherman’s passing, I was enjoying a family vacation at the Disneyland Resort. Stopping for lunch in Downtown Disney, I checked my phone for anything of interest, only to receive a notification from my friend Hayden on the passing of Diane Disney-Miller. Time really did stand still for a brief instant, and I’m not ashamed to say a few tears welled up in my eyes. I mean, here was this great voice for Disney heritage, and it had been silenced. A void that could never be filled. The one living person who had not a working relationship with Walt, but a life relationship. Someone who inspired Walt to do many of his magnificent “things,” from a theme park in Anaheim to an amazing Disney classic movie called Mary Poppins. This person knew the importance of preserving a legacy and not tarnishing a name. “What would Walt do?” is a dangerous question to be asked, but she was one of the few who could probably answer correctly – at least more than others.

Diane also wrote a wonderful series of articles on her dad for the Saturday Evening Post.

The following morning in DIsneyland, their was a definite air of bittersweet looking out over town square. Amidst Christmas celebrations on the minds of guests, and many oblivious to Diane’s passing, or what she meant to many, the flags stood at half-staff and I was once again reminded of her voice, influence and inspiration. Standing on the platform to the Main Street Station, I glanced to my left, where a light is left on in Walt’s apartment above the fire station, and thought to myself…. She must be having a heck of a carousel ride right now.

Picture taken November 20th, 2013, the morning after Diane’s passing.

Diane, I hope this is true. I hope your dad has left his park bench and your whole family is riding in a row. Thank you so much for all you did to inspire your father as well as preserve his legacy. I will always be thankful.

So Long, Diane

Griffith Park Carousel

One can only imagine the energy running through Walt’s head as he sat at on that “dirty” Griffith Park bench, watching his two daughters ride on the nearby carousel. Walt Disney claims this to be where his dream of Disneyland first began.

You wonder what sparked the dream.

Sure, Walt loved trains, and perhaps wanted a place he could showcase that love.

Certainly he thought his films and their stories were great enough to replicate in the third-dimension.

The idea of creating a theme-park had to have intrigued someone with the urban-developing and civil-designing mind that he had.

However, this author best assumes, from the stories I’ve heard told, that Walt Disney’s dream began not for any type of self-aggrandizement, but for his daughters. Watching Diane and Sharon ride around and around on that carousel, he began dreaming of a land, a kingdom where his two daughters could have all the clean, safe, imaginative fun that their hearts could dream up. Such a place was what Disneyland became. I see Disneyland and all other Disney Parks to be more of a “grand playground” for a man’s daughters than anything, a thoughtful gift from father to child, part of why I think those parks are so personally endearing.

Walt Disney shares a story with his two daughters, Sharon and Diane.

Walt Disney shares a story with his two daughters, Sharon and Diane.

Such seems to be the case with all of Walt’s creations. His dreams began at his home. His children had began reading these little story books about a nanny in England that flew around with an umbrella. His children loved them so much, he thought certainly he could bring this “Mary Poppins” character to life for them in a far greater way.

It’s my opinion, and you can hold me to it, but if it wouldn’t have been for Walt’s two daughters, I can’t imagine many of Disney’s greatest moments ever coming to fruition. They certainly wouldn’t have turned out the way they have. There certainly wouldn’t have been the same motives behind it. We have so very much to thank his girls for.

It hurts my heart to report that Diane Disney Miller, the oldest of Walt’s daughters, has passed away due to complications from a fall she had taken earlier, at the age of 79.

Diane Disney Miller, standing in front of one of her greatest contributions to the DIsney legacy: The Walt Disney Family Museum.

Diane Disney Miller, standing in front of one of her greatest contributions to the DIsney legacy: The Walt Disney Family Museum.

I can claim absolutely no close, personal association to Diane, or with anyone in the Disney family. I am merely an admirer of such. However, this news comes as such a hit to the heart to all of us Disney loyal. Diane was the last surviving member of Walt’s immediate family. Truly, she was the sole biological child of Lilian and Walt. As such, she had a way of catching my attention when I saw her on-screen in several various Disney documentaries. The thought was always, “I’m looking at Walt Disney’s daughter; can I see Walt in her?” You always could. That twinkle in Uncle Walt’s eye we’re all so very fond of was present in Diane’s. The simplistic joy she expressed as she relived stories of her growing up as the daughter of Walt immediately identified her as a Disney, her father possessing a similar enthusiasm for story-telling. Diane, thank you for helping to tell your father’s story, for being such “a fierce guardian” (as Bob Iger so aptly put it) of his name and legend. In doing such, thank you for sharing with us your own story, for showing us that the “Disney magic” wasn’t exclusive to one man.

Diane, we’re so very sad to see you go. With all of our hearts, we say “thank you.” My thoughts and prayers extend to the family and friends you’ve left here. I hope your reunion with your dear sister, with your father and mother, was as sweet and joyful as you’d ever have dreamed it to be.

– Hayden Evans

The author recommends reading THIS ARTICLE PUBLISHED BY THE LA TIMES for a more concise, informative post on Diane’s passing.